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domenica 7 agosto 2016

Rape porn videos extraordinarily popular in India


Times of India reports that cellphone videos of gang rapes are being sold at roadside shops in India’s most populous state of Uttar Pradesh—and they are extraordinarily popular.


Porn is passé. These real life crimes are the rage,” one shop owner told Times of India. “Dealers will download videos directly into your smartphone or put them in your pen drive.” Prices range depending on how long and “exclusive” the videos are, and many are used to blackmail victims.

Several gang rapes have been reported in Uttar Pradesh over the past weeks, and the hashtag #LawlessUP began trending in protest of what many see as the government doing little to stop violence against women and minorities and corruption. Many have called for UP Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav’s resignation.

Yadav recently promised justice for the rape of a mother and her teen daughter in Bulandshahr, and has also accused India’s BJP party (which has close ties to India’s Hindu nationalist organization Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh) of using the rape to launch a political conspiracy.

Conspiracy or not, women are still being raped, threatened, blackmailed and silenced, and despite harsher punishments for rapists, change appears slow.

Videos of gang rapes allegedly all 'the rage' in India Jaya Saxena Aug 5 2016

Gang Rape Videos sell for £1 in India August 5, 2016

Horrifying 'Rape Videos' Become Best Sellers on Illicit Indian MarketNoah SEELAM 04.08.2016

Minor girl raped in Ballia, video goes viral  

Ghaziabad: 15-year-old blackmailed with rape video, abused for months August 7, 2016

It’s a big porn bazaar out there in the rural Hindi heartland. A porn bazaar that offers virtual and voyeuristic sex experience to uninitiated, testosterone-driven youth.
College and school dropouts, after an education that makes them unemployable in a formal and structured job market have a new tool in their hands; cheap and affordable smartphones. It’s a weapon that equips them to consume pornography cheap, easy and at will.
Voyeurism has a new definition and dimension. The demographic dividend has a downside.
In that big porn bazaar, everything is consumable. From child and teen porn to extreme gangbang to sadistic, violent sex- the voyeuristic youth consume anything that is available. It incudes what Times of India reported in Thursday’s edition Dark trade: Rape Videos.
In rural areas, where the mixing of sexes are still taboos, where boys are taught to exhibit unabashed masculine traits that promote gender inequality, easy access to pornography through smartphones is a recipe for crime against women. Where khap panchayats and caste organisations go to the extent of killing young men and women entering into any liaison, availability of all sorts of porn holds a threat to women.
Now even porn is passé.
“The real life crime is the rage,” a shopkeeper at Agra who was talking about rape videos told a TOI reporter.
From violent and dehumanising porn to rape videos – it’s an unacceptable dehumanisation of society and youth.
There is no point delinking pornography from crime against women at this point and in this context. Rural youth, young men and even boys are consuming violent, brutal porn in increasing manner. They are eager to practice what they view as images and videos. Crime against women is becoming as brutal and cruel as the porn industry dishes out to young consumers in the hinterland.
Porn is no longer a benign titillation for young men who get exposed to most violent porn videos in their teens even before they might have had basic acquaintance with a female body. Policy advocates and policy makers must keep this in mind while defending people’s fundamental right to view what they like and rubbishing all talks to regulate pornography.
The rural youth who once spent evenings loitering around green fields and playing volleyball and kabaddi now spend time consuming sadistic sex and rape videos. The small town youth who spent evenings consuming Bollywood cinemas as their chief source of entertainment have child porn videos downloaded into their smartphones as source of voyeuristic pleasure.
When one saw a group of young men huddled around behind a teashop in a mofussil town some decades ago, one thought they were there to play cards to entertain themselves. A few years down the line, they might even have gathered there to consume alcohol and marijuana. Today one suspects them to be watching porn or rape videos on smartphones in evenings. Technology has made it so easy.
In small towns and rural areas, group psychology determines youth behaviour in significant way. Community lives still drive one’s character and behaviour. Young men live and move in groups. They eat, drink and watch pornography in groups. Jobless and idle, they are prone to developing group relationships to become partners in crime.
Clips of pornographic videos are available at corner pan (beetle nuts) and grocery shops. Cyber cafes still do brisk business helping people book train tickets, fill in college admission and job application forms. On side, the cyber cafes are also porn hubs. Earlier, the cafes’ cubicles were purveyors of pornography. Now the cafes download clips of pornography into smartphones of curious young men and boys.
Easy access to pornography and familiarity with porn sex doesn’t help them develop close and healthy relationships with women in a society that is hostile to normal men-women interactions. On the contrary, studies have proved that early exposure and frequent watching of pornography hamper men develop their sexuality and ability to have normal relationships in societies that don’t promote gender equality.
Studies have also proved that after watching violent and sadistic pornography men are more likely to develop aggressive sexual tendencies towards women. Such tendencies are more likely in societies, which have skewed men-women relationships and huge gender inequality, such as ours.
Often we make the mistake of classifying school going teens from small towns and rural areas with their urban counterparts. Shifts in technology have been a great leveller but still a lot of ground remains to be covered to bring small town and rural youth on a par with the metropolitan youth. Their orientation is different, their culture is different and they are different. The policy prescription for them has to be different.
Earlier, the incidents of rapes in rural societies were largely confined to landlords forcing them against will of the women as a form of feudal exploitation, expression of power and revenge. Rape was a form of punishment and subjugation. Outside that framework of feudal relationship, rape of women was not common.
There has been a sharp increase in incidences of rape of women in small town and villages too. Jobless youth with frustration over their inability to ape urban youth’s lifestyle use of alcohols and drugs and access to smartphones with cheap availability of clips of porn make them vulnerable to all sorts of crime.
Sex crimes against women, molestation and rape are fast becoming a fetish in such situations.
 This post originally appeared here.

India’s sick interest in rape porn is dehumanising August 5, 2016

They sit on charpais (wooden cots), perch on treetops, speak to anyone they can get hold of, and, in between, eat chips and drink cups of chai (tea). This is not a picnic. These are members of the Indian media waiting breathlessly to pounce on anyone who can give them a sound byte for the latest breaking story, the terrifying gangrape of a woman and her 14-year-old daughter on Highway 91 in Bulandshahr, Uttar Pradesh, in northern India, on July 29.


The father of the young girl is instructed to cover his face because the TV-wallahs have no time to blur his face. He pleads, as reported by the Hindustan Times newspaper on Aug. 03: “How many times should I repeat what happened with my daughter and my wife? They have been raped. What else do you want to know? My daughter was better till last night. With all the people visiting, she is now being asked to recall everything again. She has fallen sick again. She cannot stop crying. Please leave us alone.”

Yet, they persist, the media and politicians. While this is what politicians do, rush to places where they can milk a tragedy for political gain, is this what the media ought to be doing? Has the Indian media lost all sense of perspective? Do words like “sensitivity” even pass through the minds of the editors who assign reporters to such stories? Are there higher standards of insensitivity in the way we handle stories where poor people are involved?



Clearly, more than three-and-a-half years since the ghastly gangrape in Delhi on Dec. 16, 2012, the media has learned nothing about how to cover sexual assault.

Intrusive reporting

Back then, many in the media believed that their focus on the Delhi rape played an important role in bringing about changes in the law even though it was the Justice Verma Committee report that actually pushed the government to make these changes.
The media went to great lengths to hide the identity of the woman raped, a requirement under the law, by even giving her a fictitious name. But even then, there were news channels that found out where the woman lived, sent out cameras that exposed the family and would have ultimately revealed the woman’s identity had she survived the horrendous assault.
A little over seven months later, there was another gangrape, this time in Mumbai. In what came to be known as the “Shakti Mills gangrape”, a woman on a work assignment was raped in central Mumbai, a stone’s throw away from a busy railway station. As in the Delhi case, the media went after the story. But had there been any introspection about media coverage since Dec. 16?
Some newspapers decided to use the term “survivor” instead of “victim”. Yet, nothing substantial had changed.
Even if no one mentioned the name of the woman, and thankfully did not give her a fictitious name, they thought nothing of pursuing every other angle to the story.
For instance, even when the name is not revealed, by identifying the parents, or husband and children, or the neighbourhood where she lives, or the place where she works, the media is revealing the identity of the woman.

In the Shakti Mills case, Mumbai’s leading newspaper saw nothing wrong in sending a reporter to the building where she lived, and virtually informing the watchmen and the neighbours about what had happened by asking them if they knew that a woman in their building had been gangraped.
It went further by sending a reporter to the hospital to dig out other details about the rape despite the family begging the media not to write about it, and also helpfully gave away the religion of the survivor by speaking to the head of her religious community.

Breaking news

In an age of television, this problem has become worse. In the rush to be the first to get “breaking news”, TV channels have been tripping over their own wires to interview anyone and everyone who can speak of a rape.
What is happening in Khoda, Noida, where the two survivors of the Bulandshahr rape live, is perhaps the most shameful. By hounding them, the media is compounding the horror that these women have to live with for the rest of their lives. They thought they would be safe if they moved back to their own neighbourhood. Now everyone there knows, the young girl cannot go back to school and the family does not know where to go.
Surely this ought to shake us in the media and make us introspect. How many times must we be reminded that our job as journalists is to report but not to exploit the suffering of those who cannot fight back, who are already beaten down, who have no voice in the normal course of affairs?
Predictably, though, the media usually refuses to look inwards even as we expose the faults of the world around us. As if to illustrate this, even as the Hindustan Times newspaper reported on the excesses of the media in the Bulandshahr rape case on Aug. 03, its editorial on Aug. 04 found no mention of this. It castigated politicians and wrote: “The aim should be to help victims get past their ordeal and get on with their lives. For this, we need better law enforcement, speedier justice delivery, and emotional assistance.” And a more sensitive media?

The exploitation of rape victims by Indian journalists Kalpana Sharma August 05, 2016 

Over 450 minors raped in Delhi this year 7 agosto 2016

13-year-old girl gang-raped and filmed 30 luglio 2016

Branco violenta ragazzo e filma lo stupro 19 luglio 2016

Stupro al centro massaggi: nel video un bimbo di 8 anni 23 luglio 2016

Three men gang rape, film teenager 17 luglio 2016

Quindicenne stuprata e ripresa col telefonino 5 luglio 2016

Four teens raped a 16-year-old girl then shared a video 15 giugno 2016

I ragazzi dello stupro: «Vivono di pane e pornografia» 29 giugno 2016

Violence Against Women in Pornography 15 luglio 2016

Proliferation of Rape Porn 24 MAGGIO 2015

Internet porn and the rape 31 AGOSTO 2013

A peek into psychology, technology behind proliferation of rape porn May 25, 2015 ABHISHEK SAHA

How porn led Ted Bundy to serial killings 26 luglio 2016

Addicted to Porn 23 luglio 2016

Health warning on porn for sex addicts 28 maggio 2016

MAN INTERRUPTED 18 APRILE 2016

Brainwashed Teens 1 DICEMBRE 2015

(DIS)CONNECTED MAN 10 MAGGIO 2015

GENERATION Z 30 APRILE 2015

PORN GENERATION  8 APRILE 2016

Pornography: a grave threat to public health 14 luglio 2016

Porn: a ‘public health crisis’ 30 GENNAIO 2016

PORNO NEUTRALITA' 31 OTTOBRE 2015

Brock Turner Rule: Fighting Porn and Rape Culture 23 giugno 2016

Global Porn 18 GENNAIO 2016

New Studies Link Porn to Sexual Violence 9 GENNAIO 2016

Sexual Revolution and Rape Culture  2 GENNAIO 2016

PORN INDIA 8 OTTOBRE 2015

India: consequences of violent and teen porn 24 MARZO 2016

Online Porn, Rape and Internet Censorship in India 10 GENNAIO 2015

The war against pornography in India 18 AGOSTO 2015

Porn Holocaust 5 AGOSTO 2015

Does the porn industry encourage rape? 14 03 2012

Online pornography to be blocked 22 LUGLIO 2013

GUERRA AL PORNO: LA CENSURA DI INTERNET 7 DICEMBRE 2014

Child Sexual Abuse: Dark Web’s darkest activity 1 GENNAIO 2015

PORN CULTURE LA CULTURA DELL'OSCENO 25 NOVEMBRE 2014

PORN INDUSTRY 24 APRILE 2016

PORN: A CULTURE OF VIOLENCE 29 MAGGIO 2016

How Internet Pornography facilitates Pedophilia and Sexual Abuse 19 GENNAIO 2015


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